Welcome to Big Mama's BBQ Place Big Mama’s BBQ Place is a delightful, comfortable neighborhood restaurant where you can enjoy the amazing tastes and culture of Louisiana without having to buy a plane ticket. Whether you’re enjoying jambalaya, drinking an ice cold lemonade or finishing your meal with a delicious order of pork ribs, you’re sure to leave happy. Stop by and see for yourself. Big Mama’s BBQ Place is known as a Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) that serves with a minimal table service. We offer counter-service to take food orders, pay for your meal and sit down to enjoy. As a QSR we can provide menu items at a lower price to our customers. We do take reservations. Big Mama's BBQ Place brings the flavor and atmosphere of a New Orleans neighborhood restaurant to Oroville, with classic dishes invented in the Big Easy's greatest kitchens. Taste all the goodness of the South at Big Mama's BBQ Place. *Planning a special event? Let Big Mama's BBQ Place cater your next get together. Click the "Catering" tab to see a copy of our catering menu.

1. Get 1 stamp for every $10 you spend.

2. Get 1 free drink after you collect 4 stamps.

3. Get 1 free dessert after you collect 8 stamps.

4. Get 1 free Po-Boy sandwich after you collect 12 stamps.

5. Get 1 free rib dinner after you collect 15 stamps.

Click to Join

Big Mama’s Specials

Pulled Pork Po Boy Sandwich: 7.00

Hot Link or Polish Sausage: 3.50

Hamburger Meal w/ Fries & Drink: 6.00

 

Monday: Jambalaya Night

(4pm – Closing)

Buy One Get One 50% Off

 

Tuesday – Wednesday: Rib Dinner

Buy One Get One 50% Off

 

Thursday: Chicken Wing Night

(4pm – Closing)

Buy One Get One 50% Off

 

Friday: Fish & Fries: 10.50

 

Only @ Big Mama's BBQ Place

Chef KP Soul Seasoning

Chef KP Seasoning out of the Louisiana Bayou is the perfect blend of zesty, spicy, savory flavors that bring out the best   "Bayou" flavors on anything you use it on.  Add to your dishes. Here are some ways we use Chef KP Soul Seasoning at Big Mama's BBQ Place. Rub for our BBQ meats, fish fry and side dishes seasoning.

 "Not Your Daddy's Sauce"

BBQ Sauce

Chef Hall "Not Your Daddy's Sauce " is for backyard chefs that are passionate about BBQ.  It's a tangy, vinegar based robust BBQ sauce that delivers delicious taste.  Use it on ribs, chicken, beef or links.  It also great as a dipping sauce right out of the bottle.

Chef KP Lemonade

Chef KP Lemonade is the best lemonade  available that has a smooth taste with no aftertaste or bitterness.  Try a beverage or take home a 1/2 gallon today.

Seafood & Southern

Fried Food

BBQ Meats

BBQ Sides

FAQ I'm not familiar with Louisiana cuisine, exactly what kind of food do you serve?. Louisiana is most famous for its Cajun and Creole cuisine. Outside Louisiana the distinctions between Cajun and Creole cuisine have blurred. Traditionally, Creole food is genteel city food and Cajun is rustic country food. Cajun food as a whole has been called “more Mediterranean than North American”. Bell peppers, onion and celery form the base of most dishes, as well as garlic and cayenne pepper. Cajun food also borrows from African and Native American styles of cookery. Gumbo takes its name from the West African and Caribbean name for okra, which is often a main ingredient of these dishes. File, or powdered sassafras leaves, was used by the Choctaw Indians before Cajuns began cooking. Cajun food, despite its reputation, is not necessarily spicy hot. Cajun spice blends are often richly flavored without heat, although some Cajun spices will certainly burn you! We carry a standard Chef KP Soul Seasoning in both regular, which has a pleasant moderate heat, and Extra Hot for folks who like the burn. Cajun’s Fry, Creole sauté. Both Creole and Cajun aficionados will tell you it’s all about the “roux” — a mix of fat and flour that is browned in a saucepan and used to thicken a dish’s base or sauce. In Creole cookery, the roux is lighter in color and thinner; in Cajun, it’s darker and thicker — differences that affect the color and taste of the gumbos. The spiciest dishes we serve would be considered “medium” in terms of heat. Those dishes include: gumbo, jambalaya, grilled polish and hot link sausage, and the shrimp creole. Of course we provide plenty of hot sauce for those of you who like things really spicy. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes. Can I order food to go? Absolutely! To go orders typically take about ten to fifteen minutes to prepare but please allow up to twenty minutes during peak dinner hours. Do you do catering? We do have a catering menu available which features large quantities of many of our most popular dishes. You can find our catering menu in the “Catering” section of the website. To ensure availability, please place your order at least two days in advance. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes.

Big Mama's BBQ Place

1835 Oro Dam Blvd E,

Oroville, CA 95966

Email: info@bigmamasbbqplace.com

Phone: 530.282.4274

Copyright 2008 Big Mama's BBQ Place

Hours:

Monday - Friday 11am - 8pm

Saturday - Sunday Closed

Welcome to Big Mama's BBQ Place Big Mama’s BBQ Place is a delightful, comfortable neighborhood restaurant where you can enjoy the amazing tastes and culture of Louisiana without having to buy a plane ticket. Whether you’re enjoying jambalaya, drinking an ice cold lemonade or finishing your meal with a delicious order of pork ribs, you’re sure to leave happy. Stop by and see for yourself. Big Mama’s BBQ Place is known as a Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) that serves with a minimal table service. We offer counter-service to take food orders, pay for your meal and sit down to enjoy. As a QSR we can provide menu items at a lower price to our customers. We do take reservations. Big Mama's BBQ Place brings the flavor and atmosphere of a New Orleans neighborhood restaurant to Oroville, with classic dishes invented in the Big Easy's greatest kitchens. Taste all the goodness of the South at Big Mama's BBQ Place. *Planning a special event? Let Big Mama's BBQ Place cater your next get together. Click the "Catering" tab to see a copy of our catering menu. Only @ Big Mama's BBQ Place
FAQ I'm not familiar with Louisiana cuisine, exactly what kind of food do you serve?. Louisiana is most famous for its Cajun and Creole cuisine. Outside Louisiana the distinctions between Cajun and Creole cuisine have blurred. Traditionally, Creole food is genteel city food and Cajun is rustic country food. Cajun food as a whole has been called “more Mediterranean than North American”. Bell peppers, onion and celery form the base of most dishes, as well as garlic and cayenne pepper. Cajun food also borrows from African and Native American styles of cookery. Gumbo takes its name from the West African and Caribbean name for okra, which is often a main ingredient of these dishes. File, or powdered sassafras leaves, was used by the Choctaw Indians before Cajuns began cooking. Cajun food, despite its reputation, is not necessarily spicy hot. Cajun spice blends are often richly flavored without heat, although some Cajun spices will certainly burn you! We carry a standard Chef KP Soul Seasoning in both regular, which has a pleasant moderate heat, and Extra Hot for folks who like the burn. Cajun’s Fry, Creole sauté. Both Creole and Cajun aficionados will tell you it’s all about the “roux” — a mix of fat and flour that is browned in a saucepan and used to thicken a dish’s base or sauce. In Creole cookery, the roux is lighter in color and thinner; in Cajun, it’s darker and thicker — differences that affect the color and taste of the gumbos. The spiciest dishes we serve would be considered “medium” in terms of heat. Those dishes include: gumbo, jambalaya, grilled polish and hot link sausage, and the shrimp creole. Of course we provide plenty of hot sauce for those of you who like things really spicy. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes. Can I order food to go? Absolutely! To go orders typically take about ten to fifteen minutes to prepare but please allow up to twenty minutes during peak dinner hours. Do you do catering? We do have a catering menu available which features large quantities of many of our most popular dishes. You can find our catering menu in the “Catering” section of the website. To ensure availability, please place your order at least two days in advance. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes.
Welcome to Big Mama's BBQ Place Big Mama’s BBQ Place is a delightful, comfortable neighborhood restaurant where you can enjoy the amazing tastes and culture of Louisiana without having to buy a plane ticket. Whether you’re enjoying jambalaya, drinking an ice cold lemonade or finishing your meal with a delicious order of pork ribs, you’re sure to leave happy. Stop by and see for yourself. Big Mama’s BBQ Place is known as a Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) that serves with a minimal table service. We offer counter-service to take food orders, pay for your meal and sit down to enjoy. As a QSR we can provide menu items at a lower price to our customers. We do take reservations. Big Mama's BBQ Place brings the flavor and atmosphere of a New Orleans neighborhood restaurant to Oroville, with classic dishes invented in the Big Easy's greatest kitchens. Taste all the goodness of the South at Big Mama's BBQ Place. *Planning a special event? Let Big Mama's BBQ Place cater your next get together. Click the "Catering" tab to see a copy of our catering menu. Only @ Big Mama's BBQ Place FAQ I'm not familiar with Louisiana cuisine, exactly what kind of food do you serve?. Louisiana is most famous for its Cajun and Creole cuisine. Outside Louisiana the distinctions between Cajun and Creole cuisine have blurred. Traditionally, Creole food is genteel city food and Cajun is rustic country food. Cajun food as a whole has been called “more Mediterranean than North American”. Bell peppers, onion and celery form the base of most dishes, as well as garlic and cayenne pepper. Cajun food also borrows from African and Native American styles of cookery. Gumbo takes its name from the West African and Caribbean name for okra, which is often a main ingredient of these dishes. File, or powdered sassafras leaves, was used by the Choctaw Indians before Cajuns began cooking. Cajun food, despite its reputation, is not necessarily spicy hot. Cajun spice blends are often richly flavored without heat, although some Cajun spices will certainly burn you! We carry a standard Chef KP Soul Seasoning in both regular, which has a pleasant moderate heat, and Extra Hot for folks who like the burn. Cajun’s Fry, Creole sauté. Both Creole and Cajun aficionados will tell you it’s all about the “roux” — a mix of fat and flour that is browned in a saucepan and used to thicken a dish’s base or sauce. In Creole cookery, the roux is lighter in color and thinner; in Cajun, it’s darker and thicker — differences that affect the color and taste of the gumbos. The spiciest dishes we serve would be considered “medium” in terms of heat. Those dishes include: gumbo, jambalaya, grilled polish and hot link sausage, and the shrimp creole. Of course we provide plenty of hot sauce for those of you who like things really spicy. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes. Can I order food to go? Absolutely! To go orders typically take about ten to fifteen minutes to prepare but please allow up to twenty minutes during peak dinner hours. Do you do catering? We do have a catering menu available which features large quantities of many of our most popular dishes. You can find our catering menu in the “Catering” section of the website. To ensure availability, please place your order at least two days in advance. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes.
Welcome to Big Mama's BBQ Place Big Mama’s BBQ Place is a delightful, comfortable neighborhood restaurant where you can enjoy the amazing tastes and culture of Louisiana without having to buy a plane ticket. Whether you’re enjoying jambalaya, drinking an ice cold lemonade or finishing your meal with a delicious order of pork ribs, you’re sure to leave happy. Stop by and see for yourself. Big Mama’s BBQ Place is known as a Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) that serves with a minimal table service. We offer counter-service to take food orders, pay for your meal and sit down to enjoy. As a QSR we can provide menu items at a lower price to our customers. We do take reservations. Big Mama's BBQ Place brings the flavor and atmosphere of a New Orleans neighborhood restaurant to Oroville, with classic dishes invented in the Big Easy's greatest kitchens. Taste all the goodness of the South at Big Mama's BBQ Place. *Planning a special event? Let Big Mama's BBQ Place cater your next get together. Click the "Catering" tab to see a copy of our catering menu. Only @ Big Mama's BBQ Place
FAQ I'm not familiar with Louisiana cuisine, exactly what kind of food do you serve?. Louisiana is most famous for its Cajun and Creole cuisine. Outside Louisiana the distinctions between Cajun and Creole cuisine have blurred. Traditionally, Creole food is genteel city food and Cajun is rustic country food. Cajun food as a whole has been called “more Mediterranean than North American”. Bell peppers, onion and celery form the base of most dishes, as well as garlic and cayenne pepper. Cajun food also borrows from African and Native American styles of cookery. Gumbo takes its name from the West African and Caribbean name for okra, which is often a main ingredient of these dishes. File, or powdered sassafras leaves, was used by the Choctaw Indians before Cajuns began cooking. Cajun food, despite its reputation, is not necessarily spicy hot. Cajun spice blends are often richly flavored without heat, although some Cajun spices will certainly burn you! We carry a standard Chef KP Soul Seasoning in both regular, which has a pleasant moderate heat, and Extra Hot for folks who like the burn. Cajun’s Fry, Creole sauté. Both Creole and Cajun aficionados will tell you it’s all about the “roux” — a mix of fat and flour that is browned in a saucepan and used to thicken a dish’s base or sauce. In Creole cookery, the roux is lighter in color and thinner; in Cajun, it’s darker and thicker — differences that affect the color and taste of the gumbos. The spiciest dishes we serve would be considered “medium” in terms of heat. Those dishes include: gumbo, jambalaya, grilled polish and hot link sausage, and the shrimp creole. Of course we provide plenty of hot sauce for those of you who like things really spicy. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes. Can I order food to go? Absolutely! To go orders typically take about ten to fifteen minutes to prepare but please allow up to twenty minutes during peak dinner hours. Do you do catering? We do have a catering menu available which features large quantities of many of our most popular dishes. You can find our catering menu in the “Catering” section of the website. To ensure availability, please place your order at least two days in advance. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes.
Welcome to Big Mama's BBQ Place Big Mama’s BBQ Place is a delightful, comfortable neighborhood restaurant where you can enjoy the amazing tastes and culture of Louisiana without having to buy a plane ticket. Whether you’re enjoying jambalaya, drinking an ice cold lemonade or finishing your meal with a delicious order of pork ribs, you’re sure to leave happy. Stop by and see for yourself. Big Mama’s BBQ Place is known as a Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) that serves with a minimal table service. We offer counter-service to take food orders, pay for your meal and sit down to enjoy. As a QSR we can provide menu items at a lower price to our customers. We do take reservations. Big Mama's BBQ Place brings the flavor and atmosphere of a New Orleans neighborhood restaurant to Oroville, with classic dishes invented in the Big Easy's greatest kitchens. Taste all the goodness of the South at Big Mama's BBQ Place. *Planning a special event? Let Big Mama's BBQ Place cater your next get together. Click the "Catering" tab to see a copy of our catering menu. Only @ Big Mama's BBQ Place FAQ I'm not familiar with Louisiana cuisine, exactly what kind of food do you serve?. Louisiana is most famous for its Cajun and Creole cuisine. Outside Louisiana the distinctions between Cajun and Creole cuisine have blurred. Traditionally, Creole food is genteel city food and Cajun is rustic country food. Cajun food as a whole has been called “more Mediterranean than North American”. Bell peppers, onion and celery form the base of most dishes, as well as garlic and cayenne pepper. Cajun food also borrows from African and Native American styles of cookery. Gumbo takes its name from the West African and Caribbean name for okra, which is often a main ingredient of these dishes. File, or powdered sassafras leaves, was used by the Choctaw Indians before Cajuns began cooking. Cajun food, despite its reputation, is not necessarily spicy hot. Cajun spice blends are often richly flavored without heat, although some Cajun spices will certainly burn you! We carry a standard Chef KP Soul Seasoning in both regular, which has a pleasant moderate heat, and Extra Hot for folks who like the burn. Cajun’s Fry, Creole sauté. Both Creole and Cajun aficionados will tell you it’s all about the “roux” — a mix of fat and flour that is browned in a saucepan and used to thicken a dish’s base or sauce. In Creole cookery, the roux is lighter in color and thinner; in Cajun, it’s darker and thicker — differences that affect the color and taste of the gumbos. The spiciest dishes we serve would be considered “medium” in terms of heat. Those dishes include: gumbo, jambalaya, grilled polish and hot link sausage, and the shrimp creole. Of course we provide plenty of hot sauce for those of you who like things really spicy. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes. Can I order food to go? Absolutely! To go orders typically take about ten to fifteen minutes to prepare but please allow up to twenty minutes during peak dinner hours. Do you do catering? We do have a catering menu available which features large quantities of many of our most popular dishes. You can find our catering menu in the “Catering” section of the website. To ensure availability, please place your order at least two days in advance. What’s the difference between gumbo and jambalaya? Gumbo is a stew or soup that is traditional in Louisiana – it is almost always made with a roux to thicken. Ours is a bit different in that it uses a roux and file to thicken. In Louisiana every family has their own unique gumbo recipe. Jambalaya, the quintessential dish from New Orleans, is a spicy one-pot rice dish featuring chicken, polish sausage, shrimp, and a whole host of Southern flavors. Typically, there are two types of jambalaya – a Cajun jambalaya which contains no tomatoes and typically is a brown color due to the meat used like the one we serve at Big Mama’s BBQ Place and a Creole jambalaya also called a ‘red jambalaya’ due to the tomatoes.